Tag Archives: Mutus Liber Latomorum

Wolf head Dagger

In the fascinating, French publication, supposedly originally from 1765, called Mutus Liber Latomorum we find about 30 beautiful colour plates with often uncommon Masonic symbols. There is a suggestion that they refer to historical (proto Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite?) degrees. The image above comes from a page with what seem to be (officers) jewels, see below.

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G on many Triangles

In the fascinating, French publication, supposedly originally from 1765, called Mutus Liber Latomorum we find about 30 beautiful colour plates with often uncommon Masonic symbols. There is a suggestion that they refer to historical (proto Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite?) degrees. The image above comes from a page with what seem to be (officers) jewels, see below.

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Mountain

In the fascinating, French publication, supposedly originally from 1765, called Mutus Liber Latomorum we find about 30 beautiful colour plates with often uncommon Masonic symbols. There is a suggestion that they refer to historical (proto Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite?) degrees.

Here we have one section of a plate (see below). Do the first two rows show emblems of officers? The third row general Masonic symbols (perhaps referring to the first three degrees)? And the bottom row? If the image on the bottom right is the Master’s drawing board does the mountain refer to the second degree and the mountain to the first? Do all images refer to different degrees?

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Unknown

In the fascinating, French publication, supposedly originally from 1765, called Mutus Liber Latomorum we find about 30 beautiful colour plates with often uncommon Masonic symbols. There is a suggestion that they refer to historical (proto Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite?) degrees.

Here we have one section of a plate (see below). Do the first two rows show emblems of officers? The third row general Masonic symbols (perhaps referring to the first three degrees)? And the bottom row? If the image on the bottom right is the Master’s drawing board does the thing in the middle refer to the second degree and the mountain to the first? Do all images refer to different degrees?

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Bleeding Dagger

In the fascinating, French publication, supposedly originally from 1765, called Mutus Liber Latomorum we find about 30 beautiful colour plates with often uncommon Masonic symbols. There is a suggestion that they refer to historical (proto Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite?) degrees. The image above is early in the book, so it refers to a low/early degree? Simply the 3rd “craft” degree?

More about the book here.

A.I.I.

In the fascinating, French publication, supposedly originally from 1765, called Mutus Liber Latomorum we find about 30 beautiful colour plates with often uncommon Masonic symbols. There is a suggestion that they refer to historical (proto Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite?) degrees. The image above is early in the book, so it refers to a low/early degree?

More about the book here.

Head with Sword

In the fascinating, French publication, supposedly originally from 1765, called Mutus Liber Latomorum we find about 30 beautiful colour plates with often uncommon Masonic symbols. There is a suggestion that they refer to historical (proto Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite?) degrees. The image above is early in the book, so it refers to a low/early degree?

More about the book here.

Dog

Below you see “First and second boards of the Elu of the Nine degree, featuring the dog. Boards from the collection of Baron von Löwen.” (1) This 9th degree of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite appears to be a merge of the “Little Elu (Petit Élu) and Elu of Perignan (Élu de Pérignan), also called Elu of the Unknown (Élu de l’Inconnu).” It is probably there where the dog came from.

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Child

There is a fascinating book called Mutus Liber Latomorum, subtitled Le Livre Muet des Franc-Maçons. I suppose the French ‘the silent book of the Free-Masons’ is supposed to be a translation of the Latin title. The book appears to have been originally published (without a title?) in 1765 and should not be confused with the famous alchemical book Mutus Liber from 1677. It was republished in 1993 by J.C. Bailly and some say that it was him who came up with the tile. The republication supposedly contains: “two symbolic and historical studies: one by Philippe Morbach and the other by Didier Kahn, as well as the illustrations presented here”. These studies are not available on the website or a PDF of the book that I found. The original is in possession of the Grand Orient de France.

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