Category Archives: Yet to identify

Mountain

In the fascinating, French publication, supposedly originally from 1765, called Mutus Liber Latomorum we find about 30 beautiful colour plates with often uncommon Masonic symbols. There is a suggestion that they refer to historical (proto Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite?) degrees.

Here we have one section of a plate (see below). Do the first two rows show emblems of officers? The third row general Masonic symbols (perhaps referring to the first three degrees)? And the bottom row? If the image on the bottom right is the Master’s drawing board does the mountain refer to the second degree and the mountain to the first? Do all images refer to different degrees?

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Unknown

In the fascinating, French publication, supposedly originally from 1765, called Mutus Liber Latomorum we find about 30 beautiful colour plates with often uncommon Masonic symbols. There is a suggestion that they refer to historical (proto Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite?) degrees.

Here we have one section of a plate (see below). Do the first two rows show emblems of officers? The third row general Masonic symbols (perhaps referring to the first three degrees)? And the bottom row? If the image on the bottom right is the Master’s drawing board does the thing in the middle refer to the second degree and the mountain to the first? Do all images refer to different degrees?

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Head with Sword

In the fascinating, French publication, supposedly originally from 1765, called Mutus Liber Latomorum we find about 30 beautiful colour plates with often uncommon Masonic symbols. There is a suggestion that they refer to historical (proto Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite?) degrees. The image above is early in the book, so it refers to a low/early degree?

More about the book here.

Armed Ring

Jeremy Croffs in his Templars Chart and Hieroglyphic Monitor (1821) has a “Order of Knights Templar Plan of Encampment”. It it are three banners. The one on the left, has a Templar Cross and a Lamb of God; the one in the middle a Blazing Cross; and then there is the one above. You see a cock sitting on what appears to be a metal ring, with weapons (and a trumpet?) sticking out of it. The odd design has a weird likeness to a symbol that can be found on the Kirkwall Scroll.

Sanctuary

The journal Ritual, Secrecy, and Civil Society Vol. 5, No. 2 / Vol. 6, No. 1 • Fall 2017 / Spring 2018 (can be found online) has a text translated from the Kloss collection Scottish Master and Knight of St. Andrew of the Scottish Lodge l’Union in Berlin 7th of October 1747 (note the year). The original was written in France. This may well be the oldest ritual text of a ‘higher degree’ and the text seems to be similar to rituals that were worked in the London area in the 1730’s. Above you can see a tracing board from the text. It has several images that later appear in other ‘high degrees’. One that I had not seen before is the “sanctuaire” with a very specific form.

Feddersen reproduces the same tracing board, but from Denmark. He calls it the tracing board of the first Scottish lodge in Denmark “Dahl”, from 1747.

Also see Temple built Foursquare.

Hammers and Mallets

There is a great variety of hammers and mallets. Also within Masonic symbolism you see a variety, but -fortunately- not as big as above. Sometimes these different hammers and mallets have a symbolic significance, oftentimes not. In Mark symbology you often see a carver’s mallet with a chisel. A hammer on one tracing board can also be a pick hammer on another. Perhaps it could be fun to make a list is types of hammers and mallets and their specific symbolic meanings.

Child

There is a fascinating book called Mutus Liber Latomorum, subtitled Le Livre Muet des Franc-Maçons. I suppose the French ‘the silent book of the Free-Masons’ is supposed to be a translation of the Latin title. The book appears to have been originally published (without a title?) in 1765 and should not be confused with the famous alchemical book Mutus Liber from 1677. It was republished in 1993 by J.C. Bailly and some say that it was him who came up with the tile. The republication supposedly contains: “two symbolic and historical studies: one by Philippe Morbach and the other by Didier Kahn, as well as the illustrations presented here”. These studies are not available on the website or a PDF of the book that I found. The original is in possession of the Grand Orient de France.

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Instruments?

Feddersen (SO/20) calls the below tracing board: “Working board [Arbeitstafel] of the Andreas Entered Apprentice-Fellowcraft from the year 1883, almost exactly as still used today”. I have to think of a 3rd degree myself actually, and what are these three circles in the lower half? Some sort of (scientific) instruments?

Btw, German “Andreaslogen” are Swedish-type “Scottish” (high degree) lodges.

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Butterfly

Butterfly from a tracing board of what Feddersen calls the order of the Trusted Brethern of Andreas. He has examples from Denmark (SD/18) and Germany (SO/14). They are from around 1860.

German “Andreaslogen” are Swedish-type “Scottish” (high degree) lodges.

Freimaurer Wiki says of the butterfly: “Symbol of resurrection (the caterpillar transforms into a colourful, almost weightless butterfly), symbol of the soul.”

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